Professional Presentation – Part 3 of 4

So far in this series I’ve covered what being a Professional means, and how to exercise Professional Practices. Now I’m going talk about Professional Presentation.

What I mean by Professional Presentation is what you show the world. This will be beyond your social media interaction, but it also includes it to an extent.  I’m talking about a blog or website, something of your own that represents you. It’s getting to the point worldwide that you don’t look professional if you don’t have a website someone can visit. People will be suspicious of you not being the “real deal” or a fraud out to take them for whatever you can get from them if you don’t have a professional web-space – blog/website.

Don’t believe me? How many times have you gone to look for something online only to find no solid web-space for the person or company, so you don’t take them as seriously?

Most businesses have websites or pages on Facebook, or even Twitter accounts, where they can communicate and interact with the public, even if it’s just for coupons and sales. In that type of market and informational structure, how can you afford not to have something cyber-solid that people can visit about you? Don’t you want to get your name out in the world? What professional wants to stay hidden?

Having said that… I’ve been disappointed about literary agents and their websites or lack thereof. Most agencies have a website, but a good number of literary agents don’t even have a blog, let alone a website. This, to me, showed a lack of professionalism on their part. How are authors supposed to submit manuscripts to them? How are authors supposed to know what they are looking for and what format they are interested in? Their lack of professionalism makes it almost impossible for authors to be professional with them.

Having web-space gives people information. If you’re an author, it tells people about your books and where they can find them. It also gives contact information, so that other professionals can contact you about projects and working together. Without that, you miss out on a lot of opportunities.

You may be thinking that you can’t afford web-space or you don’t have time to maintain it. But, both are not true. You can get a free blog with Blogger or WordPress that is easy to maintain. Heck, even if you post something on your blog twice a month, that’s better than nothing at all. And, at that rate you’ll have at least twenty-four posts in a year – sounds better and better, doesn’t it? Plus, there are simple ways to feed your blog to your Facebook, Twitter, GoodReads, and Amazon profiles automatically! That means, you post on your blog and it feeds out to everywhere someone could possibly be seeing you on the web if you have yourself out there to be found.

Websites can be a bit more complicated, but WordPress sites aren’t too hard. If you have a handle on them blog wise, handling them as a website is easy.

You could also pay someone to build you a website, or you can take the time to become somewhat tech savvy and buy software that helps you build a website. They range from $50+. There are also Domain Hosts like GoDaddy who not only sell you a domain at a reasonable price, but a blog comes with it, and they have tools built in to help you build your site with templates!

Honestly, websites aren’t nearly as complicated as they used to be. All it takes is a little bit of time and research to know what’s right for you. Blogs are simple, so if you aren’t “techy” that’s where I would suggest you start.

[Here’s a great three part article I’ve read recently that helps explain what an author’s website needs to be successful, and other tips:]

Your web-space should be a place to show your Professional Presentation, meaning you should have decent photos of yourself, if not professional ones. You should strive your very best to make sure your posts/pages are proofread and they are absolutely the best they can be. Also, it shouldn’t be the main place for public rants and temper tantrums – people will not take you seriously if you behave like a ranting ex-wife (see Part 2 of this series:  Professional Practices). This should be where you post informed, intelligent articles about whatever you want to talk about, which should, for the most part, be about your writing. It’s your professional space after all.

You do need to be yourself though, as much as possible. There are millions of people in the world, but only one you. True fans will follow you, but you don’t want to be intentionally abrasive, because writing is a business, at least, if you ever want to sell any books. If you don’t, feel free to keep sitting in the dark corner and don’t bother wasting your time on a website that no one will want to visit. No one likes assholes. The web-space is about Professional Presentation, not about your personal life or butt-hurt over random things in life.

[Note: If you want to post pictures or anything else about your pets and your family, they should be contained on a personal blog or web-space, not your professional area. Professional areas are for business and advancing your career.]

Even though your web-space is as professional as you can make it, there will still be internet trolls who seek to make everyone’s lives miserable and ugly. In light of this, continue your professionalism by not having their crap smeared across your web-space: make it so all comments have to be approved by you before they go live. This will keep the attention whores to a minimum and hopefully keep people who want to argue just to argue away from you. But, it’s the internet, so they will always be around; it’s your job not to give them a place around you.

Speaking of which, do not engage in a public argument on your web-space! This makes you look as petty as the one who started the commotion. Let things go that will do nothing but damage you or waste your time needlessly about things that don’t matter.

Professional Presentation will take time to start up and build, but it will be worth it in the end. You will look more professional, and more people will want to work with you. If you’re striving to be more professional, put your best foot forward for the world to see.



©Rebecca Besser, 2014. All rights reserved.


Professional Practices – Part 2 of 4

[Note: In this article I talk about English, but replace that with whatever other language you use to write or do business as it applies to you.]

Previously, I talked about what being a professional meant. Now it’s time to talk about Professional Practices. These are things that you’ll do all the time to respect other people’s time and, in doing so, will have other professionals see and treat you as a professional.

With writing, all conversations that you have in a professional manner (meaning with anyone you will be doing business with or you want to publish you) should be in actual English. What do I mean by this? I mean that when you’re talking to a press, editor, or agent about publishing your work you should not use “text speak” and replace words with letters or numbers. Actually, if you’re a writer you should be striving to show that you have a grasp of the English language in all of your social media and public communication efforts. Why? This is important because, in reality, you are going to be judged by your use and understanding of words and punctuation –grammar. As a writer, your words usage should be witty, ironic, and intelligent to say the least.

A writer should have a better overall grasp of English than the common person, and it should show in everything a writer does that involves words.

[Note: The only exception to this rule is Twitter, because Tweeting only allows so many characters. Even then, you should strive to use words in a creative way.]

I’m sure some of you think I’m going overboard with the proper English stuff, but I assure you, I’m not. If I had to choose to edit or review something and I had two people asking me to do so…do you think I would choose to work the one who knows how to use words and punctuation? Or do you think I would choose to work with the one that replaces words with numbers and letters, and doesn’t use punctuation or capitalization at all? Which would I take more seriously and want to have as a colleague? Obviously the one who can show that they are a professional—the one who can communicate like a writer, not a fourteen-year-old girl with her first cell phone.

On top of the professional aspect, there’s the intelligence aspect. Not speaking/communicating like a professional gives you the image of being slow-witted. Obviously, someone who can communicate clearly, and in proper English, shows more intellect.

As a professional writer, you want to be seen as intelligent and talented.

Another way you should always exercise Professional Practices, is in submissions. You should always strive to send out the best edited, most professional cover letters, queries, and manuscripts. Obviously, I shouldn’t have to say this, but it’s really important.

Sending out professional and well groomed work (with the above communication tips taken into account) will increase your chances of publication and professional credibility. Just think… If you do all these things right, you’ll get more attention than the other people submitting, especially if they aren’t showing themselves as a professional.

And, should you get a rejection, you never ever reply harshly or insultingly. That’s as bad as “text speak.” No one wants to work with someone who has bitch-fits when they don’t get their way. That’s like working with a two-year-old, and that’s something a lot of professionals won’t do. You’ll get yourself black-balled fast!

Professionals are polite even when they don’t get their way.

[Something to keep in mind: I’m an editor and have sent out rejections. I don’t like to do it, but often times it’s because of poor formatting, terrible grammar, and sometimes because I’ve accepted something that’s very similar. So, even good writing doesn’t get taken if it’s too close to something already accepted. Editors don’t hate you.  It’s not person—don’t take it personally.]

Another thing that goes along with not having a bitch-fit when you get a rejection, is that you shouldn’t go on social media, your blog, or anywhere else public and bitch about a rejection or call an editor an idiot. If they see it, or if another press or editor sees it, they will not want to work with you. No one wants to work with someone who blows things out of proportion and makes a public fuss about nothing.

Plagiarism and royalty issues are another story. If a press or person is breaking the law, it’s okay to warn other authors to stay away from them. But, do it when you’ve calmed down, so you don’t sound like a ranting ex-wife. No one will take you seriously if you sound crazy.

You also shouldn’t repeatedly email a press or editor to check on your submission. They have it (more than likely) and they will get back to you when they’re ready. If a few months go by and you don’t hear back, it’s okay to send them a quick email to confirm that your submission was received. Otherwise, leave them alone! Being a needy writer is just as bad as being rude or having a bitch-fit.

Basically, you should always treat presses, editors, or agents with the utmost respect. Because when you don’t, you are the one who is being unprofessional.

Recap: You should show that you can communicate intelligently with words, and you shouldn’t show your ass when you don’t get your way—ever!

In these small ways you can put Professional Practices to work for you.

If you’re a professional, act like it.



©Rebecca Besser, 2014. All rights reserved.

Being a Professional – Part 1 of 4

There are many definitions for professional/professionalism, most of which expressing that a professional is someone who does something, a skill or practice, for money. But, there’s more to it than that, which is why I’m sharing with you these definitions of a professional:

Professional: a person who is an expert at his or her work; a person who engages in an activity with great competence.

Before you can even think about making money as a professional for any skill, you must first learn the techniques and tools that go with it. Since I’m a writer and that’s what this newsletter is about – writing – that’s what this article will be about; the skills needed to become a professional writer.

The definition says that a professional is an “expert at his or her work” and “a person who engages in an activity with great competence.” These both give clues that will lead you to being a professional writer.

You must learn spelling and grammar, and POV and tenses to be an expert at the craft of writing. You can’t depend on an editor to do everything for you. It’s unfortunate that most writers believe they don’t need to know how to actually write properly – with correct spelling and grammar – and expect all of it to be the editor’s job.

Editors are not there to clean up your mess because you don’t want to learn things for yourself. They’re there to catch the mistakes that slipped past the writer, because it’s virtually impossible for a writer to catch all their own mistakes. We all make mistakes and it helps to have a second set of eyes.

If you want to be a professional at anything, you must learn the skills and become an expert.

Once you’ve learned the skills and know how to be an expert, you then have to use them with “great competence.” What does this mean? It means don’t be sloppy or lazy, but always strive to do your best. This applies to writing, formatting, and following all submission guidelines. They’re there for a reason and a professional knows this.

Once you have the skills to be an expert and exercise those skills with great competence, you’ll find that your acceptances will increase and more and more people will want to work with you.

No one wants to work with someone who can’t write a decent sentence or can’t use punctuation properly – that involves a lot of editing work and time. They want to work with someone who has clean writing that’s clear and that will take a minimal amount of effort to publish.

Some would say this would be laziness on the publisher’s part. And they would be completely wrong. This would be laziness on the part of the writer for not learning their skill, for not becoming a professional expert at their craft. The writers who think that it’s laziness on the part of the editor or publishers are the ones that haven’t taken the time to learn their skill; it’s a very bad attitude to have. They’re the ones you’ll see griping about not getting acceptances and slandering editors or presses that don’t want to work with them. That in itself is immature and unprofessional (I’ll cover more of that in the 4th part of this series on professionalism).

The fact of the matter is, if you want to be a successful, professional writer. You have to learn your craft well. You have to know spelling, grammar, POV, and tenses. You can’t depend on others to do it for you.

You are responsible for the quality of your writing. Editors aren’t your grammar maids, just there to clean up your mess!

Because remember what professionals are:

Professional: a person who is an expert at his or her work; a person who engages in an activity with great competence.



©Rebecca Besser, 2014. All rights reserved.

Nurse Blood – Bonus Content

Bonus Material – Nurse Blood by Rebecca Besser

Nurse Blood by Rebecca Besser
Click on cover pic to visit title on Amazon!

By Rebecca Besser

Agent Croce watched the man she and Agent McCoy had arrested at the hospital through the one way mirror. He looked pathetic. He’d started crying when they’d clamped the cuffs on him. For his one call, he’d dialed an unlabeled number in his cell phone. From his constantly deteriorating mental state, she assumed he couldn’t get a hold of whomever he’d been trying to contact. They’d run the number and discovered it was an untraceable burner; Agent Limmon was trying to track down the towers the number had used while in the area. They suspected it was someone he’d been working with, probably the nurse.

“I think it might have been her phone,” Limmon said, entering the small room and looking in on the prisoner as well. “He had direct contact with her – we know that for a fact. The pings I found put her in the area of the Housen abduction and the surrounding areas. It doesn’t tell me exact locations, but I know she was close enough to have a good probability of being who we believe her to be.”


Croce nodded. “Thank you.”

Limmon watched the diminished man chained to a table in the connecting room. “He would have made an easy target. He might be a patsy.”

“That’s what I was thinking,” Croce said. “I think the woman used him and left him to take the fall. You coming in with me?”

Limmon nodded. “Sure. I would love to hear what this bastard has to say for himself firsthand. Who knows, maybe he’ll give us another clue.”

Croce opened the door to enter the interrogation room and stepped through to approach their prisoner.

Limmon followed her and closed the door behind himself.

Croce sat down across from the man they were preparing to interrogate and opened the file she’d been holding.

Limmon stood back a little from the table and slightly to the side to observe.

“Miles Gardner,” she said, “we know you’ve been involved with an organ harvesting team. We know you’ve been in contact with a blonde woman, and that she’s your main contact with this group of people. So, let’s make life easy for all of us…especially you. Tell us what you know about these people and we might be able to reduce your prison sentence.”

Limmon watched the man as she spoke – he seemed to slump down more and more with each word. The man seemed to know he was defeated, that there was no hope. He almost felt sorry for the man…almost.

When Miles didn’t respond, Croce spoke again.

“Let’s start out simply,” she said. “What’s the woman’s name?”

“Sonya,” Miles muttered.

“I’m sorry,” Croce said. “What did you say?”

For the first time Miles lifted his head and looked the agent in the eyes – his were filled with tears.

“Her name is Sonya,” he said in a shaky voice. “She said she loved me…” He broke down and started sobbing openly as he cried.

Knowing that the interview was being video and audio recorded, Croce didn’t pause to write it down.

“Is Sonya her real name?” she asked.

“I don’t know…” he gasped out.

“Do you know her last name?” Croce asked. Of course she knew the woman’s name from the files they’d collected at the hospital, but she wanted confirmation.

“Garret,” he said, nodding.

“Do you know where she lives?”

Miles nodded and leaned forward to wipe tears off his face with his tethered hands.

Croce slid a pen and piece of paper across the table to him.

“Please write it down for me.”

He complied, sniffling.

Croce handed the paper to Limmon when Miles slid it and the pen back across the table.

Limmon read it and nodded to Croce; it was the address they had for Sonya from the hospital’s employee files. He turned, opened the door to the adjoining room, stepped through, closed the door, and pulled out his cell phone. He called Agent McCoy to let him know that the name and address they had for the woman was the right information.


After ending the call, he reentered the interrogation room.

“…I don’t know if any of the names I know are their real names,” Miles squeezed out between sobs. “I don’t know their addresses or anything else. The only places I saw Sonya was at work, at her house, and the building.”

“You know where the building they were using is?” Limmon blurted out, unable to stop himself.

“Yes,” Miles said with wide eyes, surprised by the sudden outburst from the usually silent man.

Croce slid the paper and pen back across the table to Miles. While he was writing, Croce looked up at Limmon, smiled, and winked.

He grinned down at her.

They were finally getting somewhere in the investigation that had been stale for too long. They finally felt like they had a chance at catching the perps who always seemed just out of their reach.


©Rebecca Besser, 2016. All rights reserved.

My Goals – Passion Planner

My Goals – Passion Planner
By Rebecca Besser

Last year I kind of took time off from writing; there were many reasons for it. And you might find that funny, because I still wrote and had publications in 2017. That’s because even when I’m not writing like I should, it doesn’t mean I’m not writing at all. Writers write—it’s part of who we are. Not writing makes writers stressed and grumpy.

In case you didn’t notice, I’m staging this to announce I’ll be writing more this year!

Since I know I’ve struggled with planning in the past, and I need something to keep me motivated long-term, I took serious action. I ordered a specialty planner. I ordered a Passion Planner, and I love it!

This planner has you set goals, figure out steps to reach those goals, and encourages you to make changes to meet your goals. And it motivates you for your professional and personal goals. It has daily/weekly schedule pages, monthly planning pages, and reviews at the end of each month to help your figure out what’s holding you back and what you need to do to push forward. I think I chose well for me.

As far as writing, I’ve set myself a minimum daily word count that will give me a minimum weekly word count. I’ve set my publishing schedule on my minimum word count goal. If I keep myself going at a steady pace for the year, I’ll finish multiple books—more than I’ve previously written in a year.

And I’m sure everyone’s thinking: “Duh, that’s how you do it!” But it’s not always that easy. A lot happens throughout the day, and sometimes it’s a very real struggle for authors to hit a set word count.

Previously, I just tried to write as much as I could, whenever I could. That worked for me for years. My life, however, has gotten busier. That leads to writing being a serious struggle, especially with stress. Stress reduces creativity for me. And then I get more stressed because I’m not writing. This leads to writing being hard and me not wanting to write. It’s a vicious cycle. I’m sure some of my creative friends can relate. I had to find a way to reduce the stress and find the strength of my creativity again, and I think I’ve done it!

Something positive I’ve discovered from setting myself a minimum daily word count, is I’m going over. The first week it was hard to meet my word requirements, but the second week, I found I was getting into the story and more words were pouring out of me. And, no, I didn’t count the extra words toward the next day’s count. One day I did skip because I was finishing something else, but I made up for it the next day and then some.

My goal is to stick with my self-imposed deadlines as well, which I’ve been doing well on so far. Not all of them have to do with writing, but most do in some way or another.

There have been two things I’ve fallen behind on, but I’ve finished one and the other is almost completed as well. I expected minor delays on some things. I know life isn’t perfect and won’t always go as planned no matter how well I plan it. So, with that in mind, I’ve given myself a “within the month” allowance. Meaning, as long as I complete all my plans for the month, within the month, I’m still going to count it as completing and meeting my goals.

It sounds fair to me, and makes things more “doable” in case life gets crazy for a week. That way, if someone at my house gets sick or my son’s goats decide to kid, I’m still good on my goals.

I’ve also noticed, with doing a detailed planner, where I can get more time out of my life if I would need to. This will help me implement new activity to meet more goals in the long run.

In the past, I thought planners were unnecessary and more work. Maybe something has changed for me. Maybe I’m now at a point in life where I appreciate writing things down so I don’t have to remember them.

Maybe it’s because I’m determined to meet my goals for 2018.

Regardless, I have faith in myself. I will accomplish more.


©Rebecca Besser, 2018. All rights reserved.

Self-Publishing – The One Author Show

Self-Publishing – The One Author Show
By Rebecca Besser

Life doesn’t always go as you plan. Take today for example… My plans were to go grocery shopping, write a blog post, and work on my taxes (it’s more involved when you’re self-employed). Guess what happened? My son’s pygmy goat decided to have twins…today (Saturday). Guess what that means? That I spent most of the day sitting in the cold barn. I have the smallest hands, so if the goat has issues, I’m the ones that gets to “go in” after it. There were minor issues, so I did a bit of going in and pulling. But both the babies are out and seem to be doing great.

Obviously I worked in writing this post. I also managed to do a bit on my taxes. But groceries will have to wait until another day. Not to mention all the other little things I’d had planned for the day that weren’t big enough to make it on the actual “to-do” list.

That’s how life goes, especially for an author with a family. Especially an author with a family that’s running a small farm. There’s always someone needing something… Your child’s sick, your spouse needs you to run an errand, you have to make a call about something, you have to check on animals multiple times to make sure everything’s okay, you have to help with your child’s activities, you have to go to your child’s school for one thing or another, you have to try to take care of yourself…you have to handle life.

What does that mean for an author? It means your schedule gets blown to shit sometimes. What does that mean to an author who self-publishes? Your book(s) get pushed back until you get time to do the writing, editing, cover, formatting, etc.

I had a book planned to come out in October. It didn’t. I intend to have it available by the end of February. How did that happen? The beginning of October is our county fair where my son shows animals. So, that’s a week of limited time for anything other than that. Then, there’s recovering from everything that got pushed back because of that week. Then my son injured himself and was on crutches for a little while. Then there was Thanksgiving and my son was sick. Then I was sick. Then we were in a car accident. My son had a birthday. Then my son and husband were sick. Then there was Christmas. Are you seeing how just living can suck the life out of life? LOL

I’m not complaining. I’m just letting you know that authors are humans too, with lives. Unfortunately an author’s life can’t always revolve around books, no matter how hard they try to make it revolve around books.

But, since I realized all my flaws in planning, I’ve made changes to remedy that. (More about that in my next blog post.)

Regardless, with all that going on, a self-publishing (sometimes) author like me gets behind. Because writing a book takes a lot of time. Editing a book takes a lot of time. Creating a cover for a book takes a lot of time. Formatting a book takes a lot of time. And when you self-publish, all the quality of the work is on you (even if you have someone help you with any step(s) of the process).

When you’re doing it all on your own, it takes a lot of time that has to be worked in and around…life.


©Rebecca Besser, 2018. All rights reserved.

Read My Writing…For Charity

Some of you may or may not know that I have written for charity anthologies where the proceeds go to a selected charity to help people or causes.

So, you can read my writing…for charity!

Below, I’ve listed all the books that are currently available, in case you’d like to feed your reading addiction while helping a good cause.

Click on cover to visit title on Amazon!

Treasured Chests – A Zombie Anthology: For Breast Cancer Care – registered Charity in England & Wales 1017658

Treasured Chests – A Zombie Anthology.

A charity anthology of short Zombie Stories created in aid of the charity Breast Cancer Care (registered Charity in England & Wales 1017658). All royalties (100%) are to be donated to Breast Cancer Care.

Treasured Chests is a unique, intelligent and terrifying collection of short Zombie Stories. An eclectic collection of short stories brought to you by the Zombie podcast Good Morning Zompoc, featuring the finest authors in the Zombie and Horror Genres.

*Warning Explicit Content*


  1. Foreword – By Diane Coughlin
  2. Invasion A – By Peter Mckeirnon
  3. Run from the Dead – By Marc Moore
  4. Adam’s Birthday – By Claire C Riley
  5. Not the Main Character – By Devon C Ford
  6. A Flash of Light in the Darkness – by Marilyn Peake
  7. Scarecrows – By David A. Simpson
  8. To Walk the Halls – By Rebecca Besser
  9. Last Light – By Christopher Artinian
  10. Judgement Day – By Ricky Fleet
  11. Wolfe in Dead Clothing – By R.L. Chambers
  12. Beginning of the End (Garage Survival) – By T.D. Ricketts
  13. Bobbies Boobies – By Grivante
  14. Insomnolence – By Valerie Lioudis
  15. Concrete Jungle – By M.R. Wallace
  16. The Karakyuza – By Kevin J Kennedy
  17. Slayer – By Andrew Lennon
  18. Zombie Granny – By Steve Higgs
  19. Betrayal – By Jaime Johnesee
  20. Flesh – By Stuart Keane
  21. House of Dead Repute – By Matt Hickman
  22. Excuses – Cartoon by Stan Yan

All royalties are to be donated to the charity Breast Cancer Care registered Charity in England & Wales 1017658.

Click on cover to visit title on Amazon!

The Undead That Saved Christmas

The Undead That Saved Christmas is the heart-chilling anthology with stories across the spectrum of holiday mythology. The perfect stocking stuffer that doesn’t include a box of shotgun shells or a macheté, The Undead That Saved Christmas brings together various talented authors and artists from Great Britain, the United States and Ireland. Stories include The Magic of Christmas, by Rebecca Besser; Santa Claws is Coming to Town, by Calvin A.L. Miller II; Night of the Frozen Elf, by Richard S. Crawford; And to All a Good Fright by Stacey Graham; and many others. The anthology also includes rich illustrations by David Naughton-Shires, Jason Tudor, Chris Williams and more. Another thing to expect in this anthology is a fun collection of holiday zombie-themed poems and carols. And to wrap things up there is an awesome assortment of original comics, from Mike Schneider, Nate Call, and many others. Proceeds from the sales of The Undead That Saved Christmas benefit the Hugs Foster Family Agency ( and will help them give their foster children gifts this holiday season.

Click on cover to visit title on Amazon!

The Undead That Saved Christmas Vol. 2

Another round of ghoulish holiday stories, The Undead That Saved Christmas Vol. 2 is an anthology of both jolly and frightening proportions. From zombie toys to flesh-eating Santas, Vol. 2 is sure to be the most unique gift under the tree. The Undead That Saved Christmas Vol. 2 brings together various talented authors and artists from across the world.

Stories include: How I Got My Sack Back, by Stephen Johnston; Death and the Magi, by Joe McKinney; Zombies We Have Heard on High, by Jamie Freeman; You Better Watch Out, by Scott Morris, and others. Get into the Christmas spirit with carols and poems such as ‘Twas a Season of Zombies by Rebecca Besser and The Last Noel by Craig W. Chenery.

Whether you buy it for yourself, a friend, or family member, know you’re doing it for a good cause. Proceeds from the sales of The Undead That Saved Christmas Vol. 2 benefit the Hugs Foster Family Agency ( and will help them give their foster children gifts this holiday season.

Table of Contents

Stories and Poems
Introduction By John Olson and Bud Hanzel
Oh, Tannenbaum By Rebecca Snow
How I Got My Sack Back By Stephen Johnston
Death and the Magi By Joe McKinney
‘Twas A Season of Zombies By Rebecca Besser
Emergency Rescue By Kelly Dunn
The Last Christmas By Emma Ennis
Zombie Party Mix By Beth Bartlett
Attack of the Zombie Toys By Melissa Helwig
Zombies Don’t Jingle By Rusty Fischer
Zombies We Have Heard on High By Jamie Freeman
You Better Watch Out By Scott Morris
Christmas of the Dead By Timothy J. Collins
Daddy’s Angel By Kevin Walsh
Dinner at Eight, Dead by Dawn By Nathan Correll
With a Little Help from my Elves By Suzanne Robb
Believe, Annie By Eloise J. Knapp
The Gingerbreads 2: The Girl in the Christmas Pajamas By Lyle Perez-Tinics
The Last Noel By Craig W. Chenery
Zombies Don’t Pop By Rusty Fischer
Survivor’s Christmas Carols By Bud Hanzel and John Olson

A Zombie Christmas Story By Robert Freese – Illustrated by Amanda Stoltz
Even Zombies Need a Christmas By Brian S. Logan – Illustrated by Brian McCranie
Looking A Gift Dog in the Mouth By Wm. Brian MacLean – Illustrated by Wm. Brian MacLean
All Sales Final By Mike Schneider – Illustrated by Alex Kautz

Click on cover to visit title on Amazon!

The Carnival 13

Come one, come all! Step right up and join thirteen masters of macabre literature as they take you on a journey unlike anything you’ve ever traveled. We’ve got freaks, fantasy and fear; all lined up waiting to take your breath away.

Will you be tempted by the Freaks of the Flesh? Astounded by the Freaks of Fantasy? Baffled by the Freaks of the Mind? All this and more await you for just the small price of three tickets… and your soul.

Featuring all-new and exclusive chapters from John Everson; Jason Darrick; Dan Dillard; Charles Colyott; Dale Eldon; James Garcia Jr.; Matt Schiariti; Anne Michaud; Rebecca Besser; Armand Rosamilia; Jon Olson; Brent Abell; and Julianne Snow – this twisted tale will leave you gasping until your last breath.

All proceeds to benefit Scares That Care!

Click on cover to visit title on Amazon!

Stories From The Chapel

This anthology is a collection from professional and amateur writers, poets, and artists who all have one thing in common: a passion for the film “Night of the Living Dead”. In an effort to preserve a piece of cinematic history, they have joined forces with the Fix The Chapel movement to save the iconic building that appears in the opening scenes of that historic film. Located within the Evans City Cemetery in Evans City PA, the chapel is being threatened with demolition due to a lack of funds to maintain it. By purchasing this anthology, you will not only be entertained by some incredibly talented people, you will also help to preserve one of the last remaining ties to a film that has inspired countless film makers, authors and horror fans. We thank you for supporting the cause.

(Photo) – Chapel – Alfredo Torres
Introduction – Alfredo Torres
(Photo) – Gary and the Chapel – Alfredo Torres
Foreword One – Gary Streiner
Foreword Two – David Moody
(Art) – Burning Agenda – Tricia Martin
1 – Burning Agenda by Dean Vanderkolk
(Art) – The Chapel Restored by John McLain
2 – Poem 1 – Survival Chapel – John McClain
(Photo) – Chapel Doors – Alfredo Torres
3 – The Evans City Cemetery Shindig – Kelly M. Hudson
(Art) – Crying in the Chapel – Richard Dean
4 – Crying in the Chapel – Richard Dean
(Photo) – Chapel Haven – Alfredo Torres
5 – The World of Zombies – Rebecca Besser
(Art) – Dreamscape – John McClain
6 – Poem 2 – The Last Stronghold – Cecelia Robbins
(Art) – Save the Chapel – Kristal Stittle
7 – Refuge – Kristal Stittle
(Art) – Under the Rainbow – Tricia Martin
8 – Under the Rainbow – Paul S. Huggins
(Art) – The Chapel Restored – John McClain
(Art) – J. Dennis Bounds
9 – Benediction – J. Dennis Bounds
10 – Poem 3 – A Chapel’s Tear – Sandy Patton
(Art) – Ouch – Shane Ryan
11 – Ouch – Darren Barker(Photo) – Chapel side – Alfredo Torres
12 – Billy’s Remains – Rich Hawkins
Art – Night of the Living Wed – Philip R. Rogers
13 – Going to the Chapel – Tonia Brown
(Art) – Side Trip – Richard Dean
14 – Side Trip – R. G. Nojek
(Art) – Stormy Monday – Tricia Martin
15 – Stormy Monday – Glenn Brauer, Tricia Martin and Gordon Martin

Author Rebecca Besser's Blog