Tag Archives: Rebecca Besser

Simple Eating – Smoothie

I picked out an Instant Pot Ace blender for my Mother’s Day gift, which I got early. My son, who is obviously schooling from home right now, is taking a Principals of Food class for school. This means he has assignments to make food. He had to make a microwave breakfast sandwich, and there was a “bonus” smoothie he could make. So, naturally, we made one because I had this awesome new blending toy. And, we’ve pretty much had a smoothie every day since. We’re now addicted to smoothies. I don’t feel bad about it either. They’re healthy and delicious, and they’re a great source of vitamin C, protein, and a zinc boost for the immune system (with spinach, fruit, and greek yogurt)! Below is the simplest form of the recipe I’ve been using to make these vitamin and fiber packed treats.

 

Smoothie

By Rebecca Besser

 

1 single portion yogurt (6-8 onces)

1 cup juice

1 cup ice

1 cup frozen fruit

Optional:

1 small handful of raw spinach

1 banana broken into three or four chunks

 

Instructions:

Put all ingredients into a blender, and blend until smooth.

Pour into glasses and enjoy!

Yield: 2 large servings, or 3 to 4 small ones.

Warning: If you add too much ice or frozen fruit, the smoothie gets too thick and doesn’t blend well. You want a slightly thick consistency, but you also want it runny enough to suck through a straw with ease (if you’re using a straw).

 

Mixed Berry Banana Smoothie

 

Note: I use greek yogurt because it’s thicker and has more protein than regular yogurt. I’ve also been using apple juice, but plan to experiment a little with some other varieties.

 

Copyright © Rebecca Besser 2020

Happy Easter Weekend – Free Ebook

Twisted Pathways of Murder & Death by Rebecca Besser is free on Kindle from April 10th-12th (2020).

Happy Easter!

 

Click on cover pic to visit title on Amazon!

Twisted Pathways of Murder & Death

by Rebecca Besser

 

When emotions go to extremes murder happens.

Sometimes it’s because of betrayal.

Sometimes it’s in revenge.

Sometimes it’s to hide a lie or in self-defense.

Sometimes it’s to feed a secret hunger.

Whatever the reason, the human mind lends itself to twisted pathways that lead to murder and death…

 

Copyright © Rebecca Besser 2020

Simple Eating – Stir Fry Sauce

We’ve been eating a lot of stir fry and rice lately. I went online to look up how to make my own sauce and found some simple and easy recipes. I modified what I found and since it’s easy to make and delicious, I’m sharing it with you!

 

Bec’s Stir Fry Sauce

by Rebecca Besser

 

1/4 cup water

3 Tbsp soy sauce

2 Tbsp corn starch

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 Tbsp honey

 

Mix well and add to stir fry during the last minute of cooking. Stir well. The longer you cook it the thicker it gets.

*Enough for 1 pound of meat and 3-4 cups veggies.

*The honey makes the sauce less salty. Can be left out if desired.

Note: You don’t need a wok to make stir fry. Just half-cook your meat in a large skillet and then add in fresh or frozen vegetables (usually three to four different vegetables) and cook until  vegetables are warmed through. Add sauce (recipe above), stir in, cook for a couple minutes, and serve over rice.

 

Copyright © Rebecca Besser 2020

Besser Books Anthologies – Open Calls

Title: For One Roll

  • The stories for this anthology should be the toilet paper equivalent of what would you do for a Klondike Bar, but what would you do for a roll of toilet paper in a world where TP is scarce. Think someone who has a grandma that is embarrassed about having diarrhea and they love her so much they would do anything to get her some TP. Or someone who is tired of smelling bad or has a rash from TP alternatives, etc. Be creative. Be hilarious, but get freaky with some horror too.
  • All stories should have elements of satire (humor) and horror.
  • All stories should have a beginning, middle, and end. Not just a scene and end.
  • Stories should not be political. There can be elements of politics, but should be light in that regard. Your story should not be a political rant disguised as a story.
  • Your story does not have to be about or contain the COVID-19 virus and circumstances, but it can if you so desire.
  • Stories should be 5K+ words (but payment will be the same regardless of word count). No stories under 5K will be accepted.

Payment: $5 per accepted story paid via PayPal and one Mobi copy of the ebook anthology (payment after signed contract is received and Mobi upon publication).

No reprints.

Amazon Ebook (only) will be published by Besser Books (Besser Books & Services, LLC) and edited by Rebecca Besser.

Cover has been commissioned from Arc Book Cover Design.

 

~

 

Title: Isolation: Stay At Home

  • The stories for this anthology should be based around someone who is forced to stay home (for work or any other reason) and some aspect of staying home drives them nuts until they snap. Think dad who is forced to work from home when his employer restructures and his wife’s cat barfs all over his keyboard during a video conference with his top client. Or someone stuck at home having to listen to their child’s favorite CD or movie over, and over, and over. Be creative. Be hilarious, but get freaky with some horror too.
  • All stories should have elements of satire (humor) and horror.
  • All stories should have a beginning, middle, and end. Not just a scene and end.
  • Stories should not be political. There can be elements of politics, but should be light in that regard. Your story should not be a political rant disguised as a story.
  • Your story does not have to be about or contain the COVID-19 virus and circumstances, but it can if you so desire.
  • Stories should be 5K+ words (but payment will be the same regardless of word count). No stories under 5K will be accepted.

Payment: $5 per accepted story paid via PayPal and one Mobi copy of the ebook anthology (payment after signed contract is received and Mobi upon publication).

No reprints.

Amazon Ebook (only) will be published by Besser Books (Besser Books & Services, LLC) and edited by Rebecca Besser.

Cover has been commissioned from Arc Book Cover Design.

 

~

 

Submission:

  • Email submissions only to submissions @ rebeccabesser.com (without the spaces around @) Questions can be sent to the same address with Anthology Question in the subject line.
  • The title of the anthology you are submitting to and your last name should appear in the subject line of your email.
  • Your bio should appear in the body of your email below your cover letter. (The bio provided will be used in the anthology if your story should be accepted.)
  • Only one story per author, per anthology. You must send each submission in a separate email.
  • Your story should be submitted in Word doc or docx (attached) in standard manuscript format. (Don’t know what that is? Look it up.)
  • You should use Times New Roman 12pt font.
  • If you want something in Italics, make it so in the document.
  • Do not use bold or underline text, or any other fancy formatting.
  • Submissions are open from when these guidelines go live, until each anthology is full.

 

*ANY STORY/SUBMISSION THAT DOES NOT FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES OUTLINED ABOVE WILL BE DELETED UNREAD AND WITHOUT NOTICE.

Simple Eating – Fresh Salsa

This is a recipe that can be changed every which way to accommodate any preferred taste, but it’s also great straight forward. I’ve used it for chili, chips and salsa, tacos, and even lettuce wraps. You can put it on almost anything for any meal to add flavor with fresh veggies! It’s also cheap and easy to make. I guarantee you’ll make it time and again.

 

Fresh Salsa

by Rebecca Besser

 

Ingredients:

3 large tomatoes

1 medium to large onion

2 jalapenos

1 tsp salt

 

Instructions:

Dice tomatoes. Finely dice onions and jalapeno peppers (remove veins (the pith) and seeds if you don’t want the heat from the jalapenos).

Add salt to taste (you don’t have to use it all–add in half and see if it’s enough, and add additional if/as needed).

Mix well until combined.

It should look like this:

 

Optional ingredients:

You can add a can of drained corn, black beans, and/or black eyed peas.

You can add lime juice if you want more acid.

You can add a tablespoon or two into smashed avocados, lime juice, and cilantro (if you like it) and wham you have guacamole!

You can use different peppers–poblano peppers or even bell peppers–instead of jalapenos.

You can use frozen or canned jalapenos if that’s what you have.

 

Best if eaten within a week.

 

Copyright © Rebecca Besser 2020

How To Approach An Author – Dos and Don’ts

How To Approach An Author – Dos And Don’ts

By

Rebecca Besser

 

Most writers/authors aren’t jerks, but they can come across as jerks on social media.

Why?

Because most writers/authors aren’t sitting around waiting for someone to randomly message/contact them on social media. They’re writing, dealing with their family life, and basically just living as human beings. Writers/authors may seem like magical creative creatures that live in an alternate reality where things are much more beautiful and artistic, but they live on planet Earth and have the same issues as other people: they have kids, spouses, get sick, have doctor appointments, run errands, etc.

Add on top of that real life stuff that they deal with constant deadlines and they’re trying to fit all the normal life stuff around their writing time. Or their writing time around all the normal life stuff. The last thing writers/authors need is someone who contacts them out of the blue asking a bazillion questions about writing.

So, when you get ignored or shut down by terse responses, know that the writer/author isn’t out to be a jerk. We do try to be polite. We do like our fans. We do want to encourage you. We do want to hear about what you think of our books (in a nice way—no one likes rude assholes).

Note: We do love to hear from people who love our stuff; it encourages us. And one of the absolute best ways to do so is to write reviews for our books and post them (Amazon or Goodreads are good places to post). If you just message us and tell us, that’s great too, but reviews are like giving a writer/author a surprise present. We love them. And they help with sales and our careers, which means the world to us. Reviews are the best way to show your favorite writer/author support.

And since that’s all true for those of us who aren’t really jerks (there are some that really are), here are three ways for you to get information from your favorite writer/author without coming across like a needy time-sucker that can’t make an appointment:

 

  • Write and send an email. Most have blogs or websites with at least a contact page. This would allow the writer/author the opportunity to get back to you when they have time. Most will.
  • Ask the writer/author to write a blog post about what you’d like to know. Chances are, other people out in the world would love to hear what the writer/author has to say too.
  • Ask the writer/author for book recommendations or resources about writing where the information you’re seeking is already available. There are many. Chances are, if you look around, you’ll find some helpful stuff on your own.

 

Please keep in mind that unless you know the writer/author personally and they’ve said to hit them up sometime with your questions, that it’s not okay to expect them to be available when you randomly contact them. They don’t live on your schedule. You need to give them time to respond to things like messages/emails without bugging them constantly.

I know it can be hard. I know you sometimes feel a connection over the writer/author’s work…but the writer/author doesn’t know you personally. They aren’t your best friend, but you can possibly become friends if you show restraint and respect in how you contact and try to communicate with them.

 

Copyright © Rebecca Besser 2020

2020 – Managing New Year’s Expectations

2020 – Managing New Year’s Expectations

By Rebecca Besser

 

Today is New Year’s Day, the first day of 2020. On social media people are sharing their resolutions and plans for the upcoming year. That’s all well and good…if you can keep to them. But most people don’t. By the third week to the end of January, the likeliness is that most people will become depressed because they’re failing to meet the lofty goals they’ve set for themselves. Why? Because most of the goals are unrealistic or too big to accomplish easily or in a short time period, which people need to stay motivated. Most people will give up on what they want when they realize it’s going to take time and work.

So, what’s the point? I don’t get it. I’ve set goals at the beginning of the year before. I’ve also set goals mid-year and random other arbitrary points on the calendar. I try to make changes in my life when I see the need for that change. The day, the time, the year doesn’t matter…and it shouldn’t. And that’s why I don’t do New Year’s Resolutions (and that’s completely a personal choice).

Making one point in the year so important people put weight on all the value of change causes undo pressure. And when they fail, the depression arrives. So…why not set goals at your speed, on your schedule? It’s healthier. Not everyone is ready to make big choices for their lives at the same time. Human existence, experience, and need doesn’t match those of other people. And therefore you shouldn’t feel pressured to make those choices and changes on a calendar schedule.

But if the calendar schedule and peer pressure, or just the excitement of the possibility of something fresh and new like New Year’s, spurs you to make changes, make your choices and decisions wisely.

What do I mean by wisely? I mean be smart about the size of your goals and what it will take to reach them. Break down your big goals into small goals.

For example: If you want to lose 50 lbs., don’t expect it to happen in one month by starving yourself or doing some kind of fad dieting. Make small plans for each month that ultimately lead up to all the changes necessary for you to lose the weight. The smaller, slower changes will actually help you change your lifestyle and give you a better chance of keeping the weight off once you’ve lost it (however long it takes to get there).

And guess what happens when you break big goals down into smaller goals? You reach them faster and don’t get depressed because you aren’t seeing any change. You’re making changes. You’re accomplishing something. You’re doing what you need to. You’re changing you and your life.

Another example: If you haven’t been able to write as much as you’d like, and your goal is to write a minimum of 100K for the year, don’t set some crazy unrealistic goal of finding 3 hours a day to write. You’ve been struggling to find time in your day to write at all, so jumping to some big lofty goal you know you can’t meet without major stress isn’t going to help you reach your end goal. Challenge yourself to 100 words a day. Or 500 words a week. Chances are, once you sit down to do those minimum goals, you’ll start writing more than 100 per day or 500 per week. Pretty soon, once you start finding where you can work writing into your schedule, you’ll start finding more time to write, and you’ll start flowing with more word count than you’d originally planned. And once you find those times, once you’re into the flow of your project, you’ll reach your big goal easier because you feel accomplished slaying the smaller ones and going above and beyond your own expectations.

Keeping up a positive attitude and momentum is the hardest part of any goal, no matter the size. And a positive attitude and momentum are the things that are going to get you to the change you want.

I hope all of you that have made New Year’s Resolutions have great success. And I hope my suggestion of managing your goals and expectations inspires you to look at your big goals in a manageable way that will help you get there happily.

Happy New Year!